Mixing Patterns

It's no mystery I love me a good mix up.  Well, not in the real world because that's just annoying, but in fabric patterns.  The look of different patterns together when properly combined is beautiful, HOT, interesting, to say the least.  After getting myself a whole load of fabric samples (and I do mean a WHOLE load) I began experimenting and layering them to see what sort of effect was created.   

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Way before that though, I had to tackle the organization of these fabrics so I decided to color code them because I am a visual person and when creating a design I like to have a color palette in mind, so for now color coding makes the most sense.  Whenever I need a gray fabric, I'll just go to the "gray fabrics" pile.  Easy!  This method might change in the future, though.  

Mixing Patterns:  How To

For each mix of patterns created, I noticed they presented a different mood and vibe which I loved.  Amid this little exercise, I concluded "hey, you can mix unexpected patterns together and make them look like a real, non-dysfunctional family...that's petty cool!".  I also proved over and over that there is an actual "key trick" to getting the perfect combo between the patterns because all of the ones I created seemed to have the same components.

Mixing Patterns

"Large Scale Print, Contrasting Scale Print, Movement, & Texture"  

Mixing Patterns:  How To

Oversized Check,  Perfect Stripe,  Peonies - Blush,  Velvet - Blush

Large Scale Print:  

The pattern on this fabric will usually take up the majority of the space, while being large in size.  The repeat of the pattern will also usually be at a minimum because the pattern is just so large (this is specially true for pillows, where you will see the repeat of a pattern maybe twice or three times, since the pillow may be too small to accommodate many more repeats).

Mixing Patterns:  How To

Contrasting Scale Print with Geometric Pattern:

This print has a geometric pattern that feels structured and rigid.  Think lines, grids, and of course geometric figures that may or may not be molded into random looking, but cool shapes.  This print should also be a completely different scale than your large scale print so that when placed together the eye can differentiate the two quite instantly.

Mixing Patterns:  How To

Movement:

To contrast with the size of the large scale print and the rigidness of the geometric print, add a pattern with movement that flows and feels organic.  Patterns that look abstract are some great examples of this and usually morph the colors together seamlessly.  Watercolor art reminds me of this sort of pattern.

Mixing Patterns:  How To

Texture:

Think of this fabric as the 'icing on the cake' or the 'cherry on top' to your combo.  It will literally transform it with the depth it creates and simply by not being 'flat' like the rest of the patterns/prints used.  My favorite is definitely velvet not only for its softness but because it just gives anything a level of luxury (this would also be a great opportunity to introduce a solid fabric into your scheme).  Other options include, metallics, faux furs, lace (yes, haven't seen this one being used a lot but I love it), knits (for those cozier schemes), embroideries, and much more.

Mixing Patterns:  How To

Color:

Is too, uber, mega important when mixing patterns.  I'd say to clearly stick within your color palette but don't be afraid to introduce a random color here or there for some added interest.  The key here is to stay within the same color saturation for all of your patterns/prints.  For example: (and only using this one so that you may get the point) if one of your patterns is in a neon, very bold and saturated shade of color, then continue this with every other pattern in your scheme so that they can indeed be a part of the same "non - dysfunctional" family.  I feel this is the trick to those very cohesive looking colorful pattern schemes we tend to love in pillows and in beds.

Mixing Patterns:  How To

Camille Diamond Medallion ,  Fretwork - Mint,  Skylake Toile,  Velvet - Breeze

Now, go on and experiment with some patterns and you'll be pleasantly surprised at how they just go together.  

Mixing Patterns:  How To

PS:  Mixing patterns is the reason why I prefer a neutral base for everything: from wall color, to sofas, beds, to a simple european white washed oak floor.  This is my go to look so that I could really go crazy with pattern and color through the accessories :D

All fabric comes from: The Shade Store

Cabinet Pulls + Knobs Roundup

I don't know if I've shared this on the blog or not, but I've been working with an amazing and lovely lady on the renovation of her home, in Queens, NYC.  She's truly such a dream client and really trusts my vision for her home makeover and renovation. This home is actually undergoing (soon) a complete kitchen and main bathroom renovation and I've just been helping her design the new kitchen layout, select finishes as well as design a cohesive look throughout, for the rest of the home.  Just recently, I compiled my favorite pulls and knobs for her kitchen renovation and I thought this was a great list because they all have the classic look that in my opinion won't go out of style anytime soon.  My client is a super classy and classic lady with great taste and her only request was that her home felt timeless so that she doesn't have to renovate in 5 years.  This is also very important to her husband. 

These pulls and knobs are truly very beautiful, different and the best part they are all under $15.  The samples below may also be available in different finishes but my favorites are definitely the satin nickel and the brushed brass.  Skip polished brass, please.  That's just too flashy, no?

Sorry, source is unknown :(

Sorry, source is unknown :(

When it comes to cabinet hardware, I don't just consider its finish, I really get caught up on their shape because that plays a huge role in the overall kitchen design.  For my client's kitchen, I suggested we go for something understated and delicate because the kitchen is not very big so the hardware should almost just appear like a little jewel.  I really love the idea of combining both the pulls for the lower cabinet drawers and doors, plus the knobs for the upper cabinet doors.  This mix is a lot more playful and less put together which should really help a completely, all white kitchen stand out. That's right!  We are having an all white kitchen.  YAY!  So far we have agreed to have shaker style cabinet doors in a crisp but creamy off white, subway tile backsplash with a very light gray grout for easy cleaning and beautiful, white quartz countertops (still deciding on our preferred option).  Isn't this the ultimate timeless kitchen?  I would agree, yes.  Now, let's not forget the floors.  These will be in tile because wood is just too much maintenance in a kitchen.  We love the idea of having a very subtle, medium toned gray tile floor so that it contrasts to all that white cabinetry.  

Source  This beautiful, modern kitchen is by Jennifer Stagg from With Heart

Source  This beautiful, modern kitchen is by Jennifer Stagg from With Heart

Can you picture the new kitchen in your head?  Hmm, maybe not but I sure can.  It's going to look amazing and I can't wait for the demolition of the old kitchen to begin or for you to see the before and after of this kitchen.  EeeK :D 

Let's move onto those cabinet pulls and knobs, shall we? 

Cabinet Pulls & Knobs Roundup

Satin Nickel and Brushed Brass Cabinet Hardware Roundup

OneTwoThreeFourFiveSixSevenEightNineTenElevenTwelveThirteenFourteenFifteen

Of the bunch, I really like #10 or #13, while #1 and #5 would be great selections for our pulls. Which one is your favorite?  Ps: My client really loves the look of brass hardware so we have decided to use those throughout, and just for fun, here is the partially completed design board for her kitchen...  

Cabinet Pulls + Knobs Roundup With a Design Board for a White Kitchen using Brass Hardware

Come back soon for a super colorful and pattern filled post as I'll be sharing my "key tricks" for mixing patterns.